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How Music REALLY Works is a division of About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, About the Author, CHAPTER 6: How Chords and Chord Progressions REALLY Work 6.4 The Nashville Number System P AGE I NDEX ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ “H ARMONIC D EGREE ”: J UST A F ANCY N AME FOR “C HORD ” In harmony, Roman numerals represent whole chords, which are named after their roots. Here’s how scale degree Arabic numbers and chord Roman numerals are related: • A chord with scale degree 1 as its root is called the I chord (the “one chord'). For example, in the key of C major, the chord C major is the I chord (the “one chord”). • A chord with scale degree 4 as its root is called the IV chord (the “four chord”). For example, in the key of C major, the chord F major is the IV chord (the “four chord”). So far, so good.

The Nashville Number System Ebook Torrents German

Now for the important part. The relationship between harmony and melody begins with the identification of the seven harmonic degrees. As you’ll see in a minute, this is the basis of the Nashville Number System. What’s a harmonic degree? Just a technical name for “chord.” These chords are the triads (three notes, separated by intervals of a third) whose roots are the seven individual scale degrees of a given diatonic scale. Contoh program kasir dengan php array_search.

T HE S EVEN H ARMONIC D EGREES Have a look at Table 38 below. Each vertical column shows which three notes (scale degrees) form a triad (a chord, or “harmonic degree”), each built on a different note of the diatonic scale: TABLE 38 The Seven Harmonic Degrees (Also Known As Triads or Chords). Notes That Comprise Each Chord The Seven Chords 5th Note Up From Root (Interval of a third) 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 3rd Note Up From Root (Interval of a third) 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 Root of Triad (Scale Degree) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Chord (Harmonic Degree) I II III IV V VI VII An example is coming up in a minute. For now, bear in mind that each Arabic number represents a note of the major scale. So, in the key of C major, for example, 1 = C, 2 = D, 3 = E, etc.

Each Roman numeral represents a chord. So, for example Roman number I = the chord C. As you study Table 38 with considerable diligence, forsaking even a trip to the Wrong Ranch Saloon for a double Wild Turkey, you will notice that the chords with roots 1, 4, and 5 are shaded lightly, whilst chords with roots 2, 3, and 6 are marked with darker shading. And out there on the right, the chord with root 7 bears the darkest and scariest shading. The reasons for these shading variances will become blindingly clear in a minute.

Also, notice that scale degree I (8) is missing. In harmony, unlike melody, scale degree I (8) has no meaning because the notes of a chord, including the chord root, apply universally to any and all octaves equally. Again, this will become clearer as you fight your way through this chapter with masochistic but admirable determination. As you’ve discovered, chords consist of “third” intervals stacked atop each other.

In any diatonic scale, if you select any note as a starting point, you will always get an interval of a third simply by skipping one note of the diatonic scale. For example, in the key of C major, if you start on the note D and skip to the note F, you get an interval of a minor third (three semitones). If you start on F and skip to A, you get an interval of a major third (four semitones). Remember, even though one interval is a major third and the other is a minor third, both are still considered to be “thirds.” Everywhere along the scale, skipping one note gets you an interval of either a major third or a minor third. So, any triad will consist of. • A root note, which can be any note of the scale, plus • The third note up from the root (skipping over the second note), plus • The fifth note up from the root (skipping over the fourth note).